Reality Bites

Yesterday was one of those moments on Social media where it became apparent that my version of Reality quite seriously deviates from a lot of others. It was also a salient reminder that what gets published is never the full picture.

You need to constantly be reminded of this, especially with those who quite obviously use the platform as an advertising tool, or as means to show their friends how invested they are in their joint interests. Part of the problem for me, over time, is that my depth of obsession with a number of subjects has either drifted or ceased to exist. However, for others those feelings still remain, and it would be both churlish and unfair to prevent the enjoyment that they bring.

It’s also quite difficult to discuss the consequences of a difference in outlook without someone taking this as criticism, and that’s the bigger issue. Depending on what your piece of art (whatever it maybe) set out to do, should largely dictate the response it receives. Critical thinking asks of a reader, or viewer, or anyone participating in a group event not to just get lost in what they are given, but appoint personal relevance to the experience. That does not have to mean enjoyment.

This is where the whole fabric of Social media begins to show some basic flaws.

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280 characters is a pretty tough platform to get right first try. I ended up yesterday telling a story, getting the threading wrong (each Tweet in the right order, attached to the same header) and ended up copy/pasting the whole thing off into a work processing document before getting it right second time around. If you’re reacting instantly and don’t think your process through, the consequences should by now be quite well understood.

However, that’s not all there is to worry about. If you’re the person who is happy their mates are having fun and isn’t fussed when they flood your timeline, there is nothing to worry about. However, when you’ve had a shit day, and it’s time to not just allow people to be happy because that point needs to be made… we all know where this is going. I unfollow those who complain about Eurovision, for instance, because a) it’s a part of my timeline and b) if you don’t get it, you won’t get me.

Occasionally, these differences allow you an important insight into people’s outlooks.

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For me, all of these moments where my feelings split are carefully recalled for future reference. Occasionally however something happens (as was the case yesterday) where it’s more than simply a difference of opinion, and I think I see something that might not be there. What needs to happen then is the independent verification from others that a) I’m not insane and b) this can be interpreted in several ways. I’d like to thank therefore everybody on my timeline who made me feel that I’m not alone, and that this Reality isn’t just mine.

That matters far more than I initially realised.

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Everybody needs to recognise the reality checks when they happen. Being alone, having a difference of opinion that sets you aside from others is not a bad thing. It’s not reason to panic. It shows that, crucially, your reality is not just yours alone. Understanding why these differences occur is nearly as important as being able to accept that they have, and the whole process has potential to radically transform the way you think.

Just be careful how you react when they happen.

Wondrous Stories

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Question: Why is there a Bible in every hotel room?

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Considering the trouble this set of teachings continues to cause, you’d think commercial hotel chains would want nothing to do with it yet when I stayed in a Hotel over the summer there was a Bible, on the floor of our room. I asked for an annotated version a couple of years ago for a birthday present from my Methodist-practising mother in law, which caused some surprise from my husband. I’ve never embraced religion, but I’m not an idiot. This really is the most important book that has ever been published, for so many reasons, and if you think hard about it there’s everything inside. It is either a story book or a set of real-life diary entries. It is also the largest selling hardback/paperback on the planet.

The word ‘legacy’ gets thrown about a lot when it comes to major, life changing events such as the Olympic games but when the entire planet is focused on one place to celebrate sporting achievement (in all its forms) that can provide a perfect opportunity for the people hosting said event to capitalise. Making people think is a hard ask, after all: with all your personal issues from money woes to simply coping with the issues around you, why should you care about making the World a better place? As is becoming apparent in Brazil after 2016, what that country needs is not massive monuments to sporting excellence. The problems that existed prior to the Games have not been solved, far from it. Even after 2012 here, the UK has a lot of image and personality issues of its own to deal with.

Maybe the Bible could help everybody here.

Darren Aronofsky’s latest film is, if you believe certain interpretations of the plot, is simply another in a series of his biblically-inspired narratives. Although Noah is quite obviously based in a version of God’s story-line, a movie like The Fountain may seem to have less influence but really… no, he’s still falling back on the Good Book as source. It is no surprise, when all is said and done, because the parable is by far and away the simplest source material for an author to borrow from successfully. It also holds the benefit of being a story everybody understands, which makes the telling somewhat fraught. If you are overt in your settings and themes (as was the case with the 2014 telling of the biblical flood) and then subvert the ‘original’ story with elements that an audience can’t grasp or feel is inappropriate… things can and will get messy.

Until the day comes when we are a religion-free planet (and that’s not going to be a while) every religious text is shadowing every writer, whether we like it or not. It isn’t a bad thing, however, when you consider why the Bible was written to begin with, or the Quran plus the countless other texts that have become the foundations of modern spiritualism. Even Scientology, which is inspired by the sci-fi teachings of L. Ron Hubbard falls under this umbrella: just because you created a religion in 1954 does not make it any more or less significant that that which was established back before the Roman Empire fell. The key to legacy is inspiration, and the basis of the Bible are stories to make human being do just that, be inspired.

In effect, a bunch of stories is just as effective as building an Olympic village.

Faith and belief are not concepts owned by spiritualism. Both of these underpin physical achievement, drive athletes to be the best they can be: understanding yourself, being able to push beyond what most ‘normal’ human beings are capable of producing… complex systems of mental and physical fitness, combined to a whole. The ability to inspire a nation to start exercising, even when many of them were afraid to do so, is an enduring legacy of 2012 I am a grateful part of. However, many things have worsened post London Olympics, that no amount of inspiration is likely to alter. It is the encroaching spectres of xenophobia and greed that are warned of in the Old Testament, but are rarely seen held up as reasons for change. All the modern world seems to want to do with the Bible is try and justify why diversity isn’t allowed, as if somehow this will make everything right and ‘good’ again.

That’s the problem when someone tries to use the Bible as a stick to beat people with: it may often be used as a rule book, but those days are long gone. The world has changed, even if the ignorant and narrow minded still remain in power. These are stories and teachings, not doctrines. That’s what happens when a branch of religion takes the Bible and starts subverting the point: they create a version of the original tales, for their own ends, and often at the expense of humanity itself. Parables allow people to help rationalise the difficulties in their own existence, and come to a greater understanding of themselves. The big omnipotent deity thing is largely irrelevant, except to those who wish to believe that the Universe is clearly only man’s work.

Sport is not just about winning and ‘beating’ people, just as religion is now about who is ‘right’. Both of those conditions are placed on these ideas by human beings, often because they lose and are wrong in the eyes of others. The problem is not your God of choice dispenses his/her teachings, but how we choose to be directed by them. 

If you wish to understand the World better, start with yourself.